O No, it wasn’t. . !

Anyone going to the City Hall last Thursday anticipating a once in blue moon opportunity of hearing the virtually never heard, let alone never seen ballet music in Mozart’s opera Idomoneo will have been disappointed.

They may even have felt cheated.

Depending on tempi, around 25 minutes of music should have been heard. There was five minutes of the ballet – the regal Chaconne, preceded by the Overture to the opera.

It was bad enough that the brochure blurb for the Royal Northern Sinfonia concert effectively states that Idomeneo was a “ballet score” by Mozart with no reference to the opera in which the ‘ballet’ is little more than five dance episodes.

The City Hall is not to blame; the fault rests with the orchestra in furnishing misleading information.

 

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Julius Caesar meets Cleopatra

English Touring Opera arrives in Buxton this coming weekend with the two staged offerings in the company’s autumn season, Handel’s Giulio Cesare in Egitto and Rameau’s Dardanus.

As always, Sheffield is not on the itinerary as it is for ETO’s spring tour but, as in recent years, there will be a whistle-stop visit on the 5th of November to anchor a concert featuring a major choral work – Bach’s B minor Mass this year!

The autumn tour – usually with Baroque operas – has a particularly magnetic draw this time round in Handel’s opera, Julius Caesar in Egypt, usually known as just as Giulio Cesare – or Julius Caesar!

Not that it is merely a chance to see what many regard as the composer’s operatic masterpiece in this neck of the country; it also comes with a considerable bonus. It is being performed absolutely complete!

It rarely is and is usually cut as its four-hour running time is regarded as a deterrent. Indeed, ETO sees it that way and so is performing it in two parts with fabricated titles on Saturday (21st October) in Buxton: The Death of Pompey at 4pm and Cleopatra’s Needle at 8pm.

For some reason, part two begins with a repeat of the last five scenes of part one. It can only be assumed that this has something to with the two parts being performed 24 hours apart at some venues.

Handel wrote it in three acts over which, in brief, the following is enacted:

Pursuing his enemy Pompey, Caesar follows him to Egypt. Pompey’s wife, Cornelia, implores him not to kill him. He is about to grant her wish when Tolomeo, co-ruler of Egypt, presents him with the head of Pompey. Cornelia and Pompey’s son, Sesto, swear revenge.

Tolomeo’s sister and co-ruler, Cleopatra, wants to depose him. She sees a chance with Cornelia and Sesto’s quest for vengeance and, in disguise, seduces Caesar to get him on her side. Tolomeo (who lusts after Cornelia, by the way!) makes a failed attempt to slay Caesar.

Cleopatra hears reports that Caesar, by now smitten with her, has drowned. Tolomeo imprisons her. Far from being dead, Caesar appears and frees her. Sesto kills Tolomeo. Caesar proclaims Cleopatra as Queen of Egypt and returns to Rome.

Such is, or was Handel’s scenario. It is clear from production photos of the staging that the period is not 47 BC and, in all likelihood, the location not Egypt.

On paper, there is a super cast with South African countertenor Christopher Ainslie as Caesar and highly rated young Lancashire-born soprano Soraya Mafi as Cleopatra who get to sing all nine arias each that Handel penned for the characters.

Australian-born mezzo-soprano Catherine Carby is Cornelia, outstanding British mezzo Kitty Whately is Sesto (a trouser role and, yes, Kevin is her dad in case you didn’t know!) and Benjamin Williamson, another excellent countertenor, plays Tolomeo.

English Touring Opera’s period instrument orchestra, the Old Street Band is conducted as always by one-time countertenor Jonathan Peter Kenny and the performance is given in its original Italian with English surtitles.

The Rameau (20th October), reckoned a neglected masterpiece, is ETO’s first foray into French Baroque opera – Dardanus is the son of Jupiter who spends most the time trying to secure the hand of Iphise – and the production marks the British premiere of the 1744 version.

 

Schubert in Sheffield

Sheffield University’s new concert season, in effect, gets into motion this Thursday, the 5th of October, with a 45-minute rush hour concert given by PhD students at Firth Hall.

The city’s busiest concert season is again divided into four strands: Forged in Sheffield, featuring concerts by in-house forces; Sound Laboratory, which caters for contemporary music; Global Soundtracks, taking in an array of world music; and SongMakers.

This time round the latter provides the umbrella title for three Lieder concerts hinged on Schubert presented in collaboration with the annual Leeds Lieder festival and a performance of Bach’s B minor Mass in association with English Touring Opera on the 5th of November.

The season proper can be said to start on the 15th October with the first of three Schubert concerts under the heading ‘Schubert in Sheffield’. Every indication is that the increasingly acclaimed pianist Joseph Middleton is curating them and he begins in the realms of Goethe.

Of the 600-plus Lieder – or songs – that Schubert penned, 82 are to texts by Goethe, though not all different texts as the composer was prone to re-visiting a text, perhaps with a gap of years intervening, sometimes more than once. One song actually exists in six versions!

It’s one of his Mignon Lieder from Goethe’s multi-volume novel Wilhelm Meisters Lehrjahre (Wilhelm Meister’s Journeyman Years), Nur wer die Sehnsucht kennt – Only those who know longing.

Mignon is a female character in the Apprenticeship books of the philosophical saga who Wilhelm rescues on his travels the tomes, too, introducing a lugubrious blind Harper (a minstrel) who is given texts that Schubert also set.

Both are encountered at the initial concert: the three Gesänge des Harfners (Harper Songs), plus the earlier Harper song setting, Der Sänger, and four of the six Mignon Lieder, including Kennst du das Land – Know you the Land? and the fifth setting of Nur wer die Sehnsucht kennt, as a duet!

After those, we meet Gretchen from Goethe’s Faust in three songs, including the well-known Gretchen am Spinnrade and slightly less familiar Der König in Thule.

Among 16 other song masterpieces in a Goethe–Schubert timeline are the two settings (seven years apart) of Wandrers Nachtlied, Rastlose Liebe, Der Erlkönig, Ganymed, Geheimes, Der Musensohn and Wilkommen und Abschied.

Two of the finest up and coming singers around, Slovenian soprano Nika Gorić and British baritone James Newby give voice to them – the latter was awarded the Richard Tauber Prize for the best interpretation of a Schubert Lied in 2015!

Details are scarce at present on Joseph Middleton’s second Schubert concert on the 21st of November with soprano Mary Bevan, no less, which deals with myths and legend. Haydn’s cantata Arianna a Naxos has filtered through, plus Italian songs by Schubert and Mozart.

Ditto: to a point, the third concert on the 13th of February with much-praised young baritone Ashley Riches, although two song cycles appear to be scheduled, Schubert’s Schwanengesang and Beethoven’s An die ferne Geliebte (To the distant Beloved).

Details of the whole University Concert Season can be found at www.sheffield.ac.uk/concerts